Time Traveler’s guide to Elizabethan England

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Time Traveler’s guide to Elizabethan England, Part I  The Common People

Here is the first chapter of a delightful little BBC series. We are taken through history by a knowledgeable historian, right back to the 1550s. He retraces the everyday lives of the people. It is quite fascinating to explore the “golden age” of England through the perspective of the poor peasant people, to get a glimpse of their miserable lives. The host shows us the very different culture and beliefs of the time. Be prepared for shock as you learn the favorite past time of Elizabethans, Bear baiting… the cruel battle between a chained bear and English mastiffs, for the pleasure of the crowd. Or how beating your children was recommended, or how going to church was required by law…

Times change…. and values have as well. The process is fascinating. The world has changed dramatically since Queen Elizabeth the First, and many of those changes we so easily take for granted.

This documentary is filled with fascinating tidbits and snapshots from nearly 500 years ago.

Time Traveler’s guide to Elizabethan England, Part II  The Rich

Time Traveler’s guide to Elizabethan England, Part III  Brave New World

(Unfortunately All the episodes were removed from Youtube, due to the lovely Copyright infringement bots. Truly a shame, as these were excellent documentaries. I tried tracking it down but to no avail… However, Amazon carries both the original book and audio book the series was based on)

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Ancient Egypt in the Louvre, Part 5

Furniture and Household Items

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Actual pieces of furniture, put aside for the After-life, so they weren’t actually used but they give us a wonderful glimpse of Egyptian life.

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Here are more of those baskets that impressed me. Used for containers, cheaper and lighter than clay. And still here after thousands of years.

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Here are different models of Egyptian neck/head supports. The ancient people didn’t use pillows but slept on their back with the wooden support holding up their head. Even though I can’t imagine this being in the least bit comfortable. There must have been a practical reason for this.

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Here are a few decorated wooden chests, some were used to hold toiletries or herbal remedies and spices.

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Once again these are beautifully decorated. There were very few plain objects anywhere on display. Everything was decorated. It might be because these where mostly objects found in burials, and therefore more ceremonial than used objects, but I’d like to think that this exhibit shows us a snapshot of the daily life of these people, who wished to surround themselves with beautiful objects during their lives as well as after-lives.

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Delicate glass flask and jars filled this display case. They showed the glass techniques we read about in the book and was quite thrilling to see in real life. It’s bright and colorful and carefully detailed. Shame my photo came out blurry

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Here were some tableware items made of mud and clay. These were simpler and a lot less elaborate than some of the other items. But they were also considerably older. I wished they’d had more explanations on the display, but this was only a temporary addition, because the museum was worried about basement flooding. How sad would it be, that something like this surviving nearly 5000, should be destroyed in a modern day basement flood?